She’s Got It (So in the beginning it is all about building confidence and creating your persona.)

1/250 sec at f/3.5 ISO 50 168mm
Model Jade Gleason

Some photos just resonate and stand out, however like beauty it is all subjective. I’m drawn into this photo for visual reasons as well as emotional reasons.

The visual; is the angle of the face, the eyes are closed; the arms frame the face and the textures of the sweater and the headband all come together to make a visually appealing image. Then there is her youthful & natural beauty with minimal makeup.

The emotional; is the fact that this was Jade’s second shoot with me in two weeks. Her first shoot with me she was “like a deer in the headlights,” very nervous, rigid and just trying to understand the direction I was giving her. She took it all in stride and came back for the next shoot a few weeks later. Now she was eager, prepared and had been practicing her posing. When I look at this shot I see her potential, I see her trying and I see her ‘wanting.” Wanting to grasp it, hold it and run with it.

Remember for a new model modeling is not always about making it to the top and becoming a high dollar fashion or runway model. Most important it is not always about how you look per say. Although when we think of models we think of beauty and often models define what the public thinks beauty should be. However we all know beauty is subjective and because we are bombarded with images of models everywhere we turn we tend to accept certain styles and looks as the norm. When in reality fashion & runway modeling is not about the models looks as much as it is about how the model can pose creating a visually appealing image that will show off wardrobe or design. I really do not think the fashion designer wants you to look at the model as much as they want you to be drawn to their artistic creation. The model is merely the vehicle to carry and represent the designer’s artistic work.

So in the beginning it is all about building confidence and creating your persona. You are creating that person or character who gets in front of the camera and performs. When you step in front of the camera you need to pose, but you also need to convey emotion and energy. It is not always “high energy” but rather a feeling, a mood and a look all rolled into one. I sit here writing about it and I myself cannot do it. However I am a photographer and I know it when I see it. Amazingly enough I seen this moment of Jade as I captured it and what I mean by that is; She was facing me straight on and I was shooting, she for a moment turned to her right for just a second and I caught a change of light on her face. Then she turned back facing me straight on, but I called out to her “wait, turn back just like you were and hold it.” She did. There was this even and soft light on her face and with her eyes closed it gave a peaceful & blissful look. I could see it in the viewfinder and I didn’t dwell on it, but I knew it was special. Not too often do I see it as I’m capturing it. Most times I’m paying too much attention to other things like “is there hairs across her face,” or looking for some other “aesthetic distractions” as I call them. But this time I seen it in real-time and it was such a beautiful moment for me.

If you know me and have read previous blog post you know I really loth photography clichés and the “capturing a moment in time” is one that just kills me to the core. Yes I did capture the magic moment in time with Jade, but it is not the moment in time that makes it all that magical. It is the fact that she improved so much in two weeks, it is the fact she is getting comfortable in front of the lens and most of all she has a drive to learn what it is all about. I am no famous photographer, however I am a very good photographer and I have for the past several years worked with many models just starting out. I have been the “first” photographer for several amateur models. Some get it and some do not get it. Some are under the misconception that they stand there and the camera clicks and “bam” there are awesome images are created. And when this doesn’t happen they don’t understand why not. I explain to all new models that it is about posing, that it is about emotion ect. I explain to them that I understand they are new, but “I am here to work with you and help you.” I explain “I am a photographer, I know how this camera works inside & out, I know Photoshop and I can edit the images to look good, but I first have to start with a good image and that means having a model that can bring a good pose and some emotion.” And with emotion it could also be the lack of emotion that makes the image great. I will offer advice about what makes for good posing like triangles, negative space, lines, and curves and so on. None of this information is a secret, however many will choose to ignore it because now it starts to make modeling sound like work. And it is work, and like anything in this world it takes practice and knowledge of the craft to get better and advance. Even someone who has a natural talent needs to nurture the talent to bring it to the surface. This all leads us to the age-old conclusion that “nothing in life comes easy.”

So who gets it? Who gets it is the model that walks away from the first shoot and listens to my advice, but doesn’t just stop there. They dig deeper and deeper, searching on their own. They are the one who learns to pose for the camera and not for the photographer, the one who realizes right up front that this is going to be work and starts working at it. They are the one who realizes they need to give up some free time to get something in return. That’s who gets it.

Jade https://www.instagram.com/p/BgAahCUg_UP/?taken-by=writingawayy_

 

Overuse of Color Grading (…look I clicked on a filter now I’m an artist.)

1/40 sec at f/4.0 ISO 800 80 mm color graded using split tones in Lightroom. Location Eastern States Penitentiary.

Everybody wants to be an artist, but sadly enough not everybody can be an artist. Actually pretty much anybody can be an artist if they were to actually take the time and put forth the effort to create something. Today we have a lot of “one click” artist wanna-bees. I love Instagram so much for several reasons; one reason for sure is it has helped me so much with my photography business. People find me, they contact me and I have a client to do business with. I like Instagram because I can build a network and I can reach a lot of people all around the world.

So many times I have heard it said “Instagram is for photographers” and that statement could be truer. Myself I rarely partake in using any of Instagram’s filters although I don’t begrudge anybody for using them. I edit most of my images in Adobe Photoshop and put finishing touches on in Adobe Lightroom so I really have no need for IG’s filters. However I do realize the vast amount of people using IG there is only a small percentage that would edit and do what I do. So for sure they want to use a filter to take their images to that “next level” and give it a “look and a feel” and again I have no gripes. Now with all that said we all no trends rise up and most often recede and some trends are so horrible we can’t wait for them to recede and fade away… hopefully!

I remember when I first got into learning how to edit skin in Photoshop, it was a time when the trend was to make the female skin look like plastic or porcelain, with no texture at all. It was horrible and I too was guilty of this horrible atrocity. For one it was a very easy effect to create and for two, all the magazine covers were doing it, so it seemed like it was ok to do it..

Then came along the overdone “HDR” with all the halos and graininess. I have to admit I still like to use the over-done HDR effect as an illustrative tool to this day, but not for photographic edits. Same goes for the smoothed out skin, as an illustrative edit it can be used, as a portrait… no way. But… I still see people using it.

So this brings us up to our current state of “what is being over used today?” I’ll tell you what it is… LUTs and color grading, these are being so over used it is pitiful. 2 years ago I barely knew what a LUT was, I did know what color grading was and for still images I performed most of my color grading by using “split tone” controls. Or I had other methods, some I learned from other photographers and some I just created through trial and error. Some of my color grading was and still is as simple as making a solid color layer and lowering the opacity. Does it work? You may ask… works good enough the clients love it and complements on social media are plenty.

But in both video and photos the color grading at present day can be atrocious if not done correctly. And when I say “correctly” I know editing is very subjective. It goes straight back to the “beauty is in the eye of the beholder” quote. Photography, videography are all very subjective because they are creative and artistic, but with all that said I am so sick of the teal to orange color grading that is done incorrectly. And to be flat out honest I am no expert at color grading, but I am an expert at knowing what is distracting when you look at a photo or video that has poor color grading. It seems some of the worst videos are vloggers on Youtube. Some vlogs I can clearly see have had some high end color grading done and I envy it because I have not yet reached that level. While other vlogs are just… I want to say “horrible” but again it is subjective, so I will say “not to my liking.”

I wrote a post a while back about color grading and where it came from, it has been around a very long time. I what to point the finger at IG for the current dilemma, after all Instagram’s filters are just like color grading, but it is done with “one click” and using a given filter with the right image produces a great result. However this takes no real talent or effort and while one could make the claim it is creative, it is merely clicking presets till you find one that looks good. Either way it is kind of a moot point at this time… the fire has started all we need to do is wait for it to burn itself out and hopefully go the way of selective color and bad HDR. I remember the grossly overdone colored cinematic lighting that popped up in some of the 80’s movies and carried over into the 90’s. Using blue lighting to illustrate night time is ok by me, but making alleyways appear deep purple was just flat-out bizarre.

While I am learning more & more about creating and using LUT’s I still love my split toning, gradient mapping and other little tricks for my photo color grading.

Photo Notes: So this particular image I get a lot of compliments on. Many times the comments come from people who do not know about color grading, but they do know about Instagram filters. They ask what filter I used. Or have heard many times “this photo looks so cool I love the color, how did you do that.” The color grading was actually done in Adboe lightroom 4 using the split tone sliders and the saturation & luminance sliders in the HSL panel.

1/40 sec at f/4.0 ISO 800 80 mm

Why I Blog & Vlog (…Quite a novel thing those directions are.)

1/640 sec at f/3.2 ISO 100 115mm (see photo notes below)

There is more to blogging & vlogging than some may think. Often when I am questioned about why I blog or vlog it is usually a non-millennial or to be frank “an older person.”

As a photographer and Photoshop creator/editor blogging & vlogging helps me on many levels. Now first I have to say that I do not aspire at this time to making blogging & vlogging a sole means of income as is often the case. So when asked about my B&V it is usually followed by; does it make you money? And the answer is “yes & no” (a little confusing).

Ok so here is the break down as to what blogging does for me as a photographer. In short it makes me relevant in the realm of what I do and the long answer would best be explained by giving an example.

So here is Rich Smith Jr out doing something with his camera. It could be a paid client shoot, it could be a project shoot with a model or I could be out and about shooting street photography. Either way at some point there is always a chance that someone is going to approach me and start asking questions. The questions could range from a photo enthusiast who is asking questions, to a potential client or even a police officer wanting to know what the hell I’m doing. So of course the first action is to give a business card, nothing fancy, but a card with my name, phone number, email and website is all that is needed. Now of course in this day and age anybody can have a business card printed and anybody can make a website in a matter of minutes. So having a blog and or a vlog present and easy to find lets people see exactly what you do.

For example a park ranger I ran into a few weeks back seen me with my drone. I wasn’t doing anything wrong, he was merely asking me technical questions about the drone. I gave him my card and while we were talking his partner using a smart phone was on my YouTube channel in a matter of minutes and they were looking at my videos. (my stupid little short videos) The ranger than stated “you’re the first person I have actually talked to that could show me they actually know how to create a video with a drone. He said most people get nervous and they just want to get away as soon as possible. I laughed, I have nothing to hide, I know the laws and I try my best to abide by them. Same goes for my photography, I try to abide by the law… well except that railroad track thing but… So soon the ranger noticed I had a video about how to copyright images with the library of congress and he was somewhat impressed. He asked me how I learned how to do that? My answer; reading, I read how to do it and I did go to a few seminars but mostly just reading. Kind of like when you buy something and you read that little book that come with it called “directions.” Quite a novel thing those directions are.

Another example of being relevant in what I do would be the time I was out shooting with a client at a park. This was last year; a lady had contacted me by way of a friend and asked if I would meet her at the mill in Stockton for a “mother daughter” shoot. Her daughter had just finished college and was heading off to Europe for two years. Although she would visit her daughter in Europe she wanted some nice photos of her and her daughter before she left the states. It’s a “mom thing” she said. So we met up at the mill and we really hit it off right away. The daughter was a few minutes late and mom was teasing her. Soon into the shoot they were really having fun, laughing and joking. I noticed another lady watching us and soon she approached me and asked “if I was a real photographer?” I said “no but don’t tell these two because they’re paying me money today.” We all got a good laugh and I handed her my business card. She went on her way.

As I was packing up my gear at the parking lot and getting ready to leave, when the lady whom I had given the business card to appeared with her husband and started asking me about family portraits, that they wanted to do at this same location. They liked the old mill and wanted to have some family photos taken there. At one point she exclaimed at how much fun the mother & daughter were having and said I would be “the perfect photographer” because I make people happy. This was a huge compliment although I had to come clean and tell her “it was all them” they were just happy people.  Anyway I did do the portrait shoot and it led to 5 more jobs with her recommendations. What I did not know until much later was that after handing her my card her and her husband sat in their car with their iPad checking out my website, my blog and my vlog. And that coupled with seeing me actually working with a client sealed the deal.

So while I may not make actual money advertising products on my blog, it still gets me work. It shows I am relevant and sets me apart from “guy with a camera.” Another benefit that blogging does for me is helps me with my writing skills, spelling and grammar. I wish I could say I write a blog post every day, but sadly time is the culprit.

Times have changes as we all know and we have so many resources available to us that if we do not utilize some of the resources we appear obsolete in what we do. I remember when fax machines were all the rage and I heard someone say “if you do not stay current with technology life will run you over in a heartbeat.” And it is so true (to a certain extent). So I say “ignore technology and you age quicker than you ever though possible.

Thank so much for reading and have a great day.

Photo notes: While I absolutely love this wedding day image of Kyle & Nicole, I cannot take full credit for the creation. The idea for this image was actually Nicole’s idea. I provided the umbrella, camera and lens. Nicole provided the sheer look of “a bride in love” and that wasn’t hard for her to do at all lol.

Dancing On An Island (…“it is about decisive moments and interactions” )

These are the moments in life that really turn me on as a photographer. When you look in on a wedding reception and there is all of this chaotic interaction. People are eating, talking, some are outside smoking, there are people drinking and then… you see two people lost in their selves on a dance floor. Nobody else is dancing but just them and nobody is even paying any attention. These are the special moments that some wedding photographers will overlook because they want to stay pinned to the bride and groom for the whole day/night.

Wedding photography in my opinion is so much more than just capturing the beautiful images of a bride and groom on their special day. I once heard New Jersey based photographer Cliff Mautner  say “it is about decisive moments and interactions” and not all about getting technically accurate photos. Essentially at the end of the day you (the photographer) should have all the classic images of things like the bride walking down the aisle, ring exchange, the first kiss ect… Then of course you will have your formals of the family, the wedding party ect… Quite honestly these are very easy images to capture because most wedding flow the same. I say “most”, but not all. Think about it; you’re at a venue the guests are seated, the groom is waiting, the bride is entering and so on. Sure dealing with the iPhone people can be a challenge; weather (if it is outdoors) can be challenging, but after you do enough wedding these challenges become easier to deal with and overcome. This then of course make your job a lot easier and you can go slam out a wedding. But are you capturing the moments?

When we look at some wedding photographers portfolios or look at the couple’s photo books or albums we sometimes see all these great images, but are we seeing the special interactions or those special moments? Seeing the classic shots are nice, however like I said they are relatively easy to obtain. As long as you know and I do mean “know” your entire camera technical you should be looking for the special moments. Think about it; how much more you can do when you never really have to think about camera technical. You walk into a scene and you are the “auto mode” for the camera. You know what ISO, shutter speed, aperture, hell you even know if you should “spot weight metering” for a special shot. I mostly work with two bodies; one will have a 24-70mm f/2.8 and the other a 70-200mm f/2.8. I’ll have an 85mm prime for some special work that I can throw on real quick. And that is it for cameras & lenses, then there is a speedlight on a stick or a continuous light such as a wand light either hand-held or on a stick.

Some special moments take time to evolve and what I mean by this is; the image you captured today might not mean a whole lot today. However we all know time changes everything and what looks like an ordinary image today could mean the world to someone tomorrow. Weddings are the most likely place to find these kinds of shots. But if you’re just there to get photos of a bride coming down the aisle, rings, kissing and hugs you may not be living up to the potential of your job.

 

 

Somebody’s Angel

Angels come in all shapes and sizes.

Angels come in all shapes and sizes. They can often appear in your darkest hours when hope feels like a meaningless word. Keeping faith in all things you do, stay strong and lead others. Faith in your god, your country and most of all yourself is what strong people are made of. You too could be an angel someone and never know it.

Energy Failure (…bounding through the door hyped on two lattes, one espresso and a bottle of 5 hour energy)

Chevy Corvair

“It is all about energy and without energy life is flat.” That statement holds more meaning than one could begin to interpret or write about in a single blog post. Sure you don’t get enough rest and you wake up lacking energy and your day runs kind of flat. But it gets much deeper that; Why I’m gonna bet that if you thought about the most memorable concert or music performance you ever attended, it was packed full of energy. That was one of the key components that made the performance so memorable. Sure you may have like the band or the performer/singer, however if the singer came out on stage and just sat on a couch and performed… well I think you see my point.

On a photography level and speaking in the realm of photo shoots energy is paramount to capturing great images. Even if the mood of the shoot is meant to be somber and there is no smiling, there still needs to be energy. And this is the very reason I have chosen this topic to write about today. Because I feel that energy is the key component (or lack of) that is missing in many photo shoots. The truth be told, lack of energy is missing in a lot of areas of our lives and I’ll talk about that later. But for now let’s break it down by each individual who is part of the photo shoot.

So does the photographer really need to have a lot of energy? Isn’t he/she the one who should be capturing the energy? Ok, so the answer is “yes and yes.” Sure the photographer’s job is to capture the moment (oh god here comes the clichés) but at the same time the photographer is the leader and the catalyst between this world and the eternity of the world where the frozen moment of the image will live. As much as capturing images and the technique of lighting the scene the photographer needs to draw the energy from the talent/model and this is not always easy if the talent is not at a professional level.

Scenario; your hired to for a private shoot, the subject is not a professional by any means. It is a girl, she somewhat shy, she has never had a professional birthday photo shoot before. She looks like a deer in the headlights… what do you do to get energy injected into this shoot? I’m not going to go into a long detailed synopsis, which would be for another post. But rather I just want you to see in your mind how those images are going to look. “Flat & boring” are just two words that come to mind.

Makeup artist… really? They need to have energy too? Sure it is the whole positive vibe thing, you know how infectious a smile can be and having energy to go with that smile will really help any job, photo shoots included. Now I’m not saying the makeup artist needs to come bounding through the door hyped on two lattes, one espresso and a bottle of 5 hour energy drink, that might be a little (or a lot) too much. And I am using the makeup artist as an example for anyone who is working the shoot. So the same goes for lighting assistants, hair stylists, wardrobe, and art directors and so on. I know it sounds hokie , but it is so true, everyone needs to project a positive vibe.

While all this sounds so obvious it still really is in my opinion why many photo shoots fall short of capturing great images. You could have the best of the best camera equipment, lighting, location ect… but if the energy is not there you’re on a sinking ship. And just the opposite; you do not need $10,000 of equipment if you have good energy.

The model; Ok so if he/she is a professional most likely they are bringing their own energy to the shoot. After all I said they are a professional and that is most likely one of the key things that has raised them up to a professional level… they have drive and they have energy. However what if your model is new to this, they are nervous, they lack experience and they just don’t project that energy. Again I’m not going to go into how to solve this problem; this post is more about identifying and understanding how lack of energy is a huge problem. Many new photographers fall short of identifying this missing component in the beginning. New photographers are focused more on camera gear, lighting and just hoping the talent and makeup artist show up on time.

The biggest way I have found to keep the energy level up and flowing is by “planning” and more planning. Having a plan gives you comfort and this will add or keep energy flowing. Many times I will deviate from my main plan, but not by much. Some things are obvious such as everyone knows the time, date and location of the shoot. However it is the little things that can mean big problems. Now I could go on a long tangent of “what ifs” but for an example; the shoot is an outdoor location and we had to walk to it from the parking lot. Only a fifteen minute walk, but what if a rain shower comes? It only rains hard for ten minutes and passes. Where does everyone take cover? If everyone and everything is wet… well I’m betting energy level will be in the negative lol. And again that is just one “what if” that could have been easily avoided with proper planning. There are many things that can tax the energy from the shoot.

How about your energy? Your personal energy level is important. Did you get enough sleep? Seriously for me this is a big one, because I seem to most times stay up later that I should working or just watching Netflix. But when I think about how important the job is and how good I feel when I sleep early and wake early. Waking early after a good sleep for me is such a good feeling, not to mention the fact of how relaxed life is when you’re not in a rush. I have time to sit a drink that morning cup of coffee, maybe walk a little extra with the dogs, rather than racing around with the dogs and drinking the coffee on the go in the car. I never eat a large meal before a big shoot, but I do eat something. A large meal will slow me down and having no meal is even worse. I tend to snack and I try not to drink too much so I don’t have to keep taking bathroom breaks. After the shoot a nice sit down meal is so nice and enjoyable.

Look around and give it some thought, energy truly is the key thing to all performances. And a photo shoot is just that, it is a “performance.” You’ll know you’re doing it right if at the end you are tired, depleted and spent. And that holds true for pretty much anything, whether it be an athlete running a race, a stage performer or someone looking after children all day. To do any job right you need to expend energy, to create something you need to expend energy, both physical and mental. And when you expend energy you project energy and a vibe. Projecting good energy is like projecting a smile, it is infectious and contagious. Or it scares people, positive vibes and good energy make some people uncomfortable and they just can’t handle it, and that is ok. Either they come on board or they leave or avoid it. If your smile can not make another person smile it is ok, maybe they’re having a bad day or they are a miserable person. I have no problem with them personally; however they cannot be part of my photo shoot.

Your energy comes from more than one place or maybe I should say there is more than one kind of energy. You have your personal energy, you slept well, you have a plan for what you’re doing, and you have confidence. Confidence is like a smile, if you are confident about what you’re doing and you’re the leader the vide goes out to everyone. Then there is your reputation and as they say “you’re only as good as your last performance” although I tend to not believe that whole heartedly because we all have a bad day or a bad performance at some time or another. However I think more over it is the fact that others had a good experience working with you and therefore more people want to be part of whatever your next project is. I call it the “Tom Sawyer” effect. Although I am not being punished to do something as Tom Sawyer was being punished to paint Aunt Polly’s fence. I do find that if you project a good vibe, have lots of confidence and you generally seemed happy about what you’re doing, people will join in… Of course money always helps lol. Money is a motivator but it is not an energy maker. Money will get people to show up to work as millions go to their daily jobs every day. But do they go to work with energy? Hell no! People of all skill levels from doctors to janitors (no disrespect to either) go to work each and every day just waiting for the day to be over as soon as it started. While I’m not a big fan of this thing called “work” I am a big fan of feeling good about what I do. Sure I have days when I just feel down and not so… full of energy. But if I have a big job (photo shoot or otherwise) I know the key to completing the job with a successful outcome is energy.

Many times when I see a local band playing I will see a huge lack of energy. They’re playing a good song, they’re all in key and they sound good, but they don’t sound great… something is missing. They lack energy. They lack that pure raw power or energy that a great performer can put out. And again it is not all physical it is also mental in most cases it is a synergistic effect that comes from both. Think of any good entertainer that ever took to the stage whether it be Billy Joel sitting at a piano or Mick Jagger, Steven Tyler and of course the list could go on and on, but you get the point. I am a huge AC-DC fan and I am also a guitar player and I can play a few AC-DC songs pretty damn good. But could I ever project the energy that Angus Young projects while he is performing? Just watching him makes me tired and again I am just using him as one small example. But when I walk into a club or a bar and I see somebody covering an AC-DC song… sure the song sounds good, the singing, the guitar, but most times the energy is not even comparable. This just confirms the difference between one who has learned how to play the guitar and one who has learned how to play the guitar and use it to master the art of performing while playing a guitar.

Ok, so let’s apply this concept to photography. There are millions of camera geeks out there that know all the tech specs of their cameras and their neighbor’s cameras. They can even tell you all the specs of the cameras that haven’t even been released yet. They spend hours, days and months reading the camera gaga on the internet. So while they have this vast data base of knowledge filling up their brain, subscribing to every tutorial site and taking in every camera expo, they still cannot create and to them energy is something that comes from a rechargeable battery. They’ll never “get it” and some don’t really “want it.” “It” being the ability to use a camera to find energy and capture it or to pull energy from the model or subject and capture it. I’m not here to say it is easy nor am I saying I have mastered it. What I am saying is “without it, you’re just another Saturday night bar band chugging away at playing a tune someone else created.”

So I will say it again “it is not about high dollar gear or fancy cameras” but rather the ability to create energy and capture energy. Learn how to use your tools, your camera and your lights, learn how to pose and after all of these things are in place create some energy and capture it.

Thank you for reading and have a great day.

 

I Did It! (…not just sit on a porch smoking cigarettes and posting countless selfies. )

So I guess it is official… As of today I am a web entrepreneur. I received my first payment from my Amazon Associates account. I opened my associates account well over 10 years ago and never did anything with it. Actually at the time I had no idea what to do with it, but I knew one day I would find something or someway to make it work.

I started a blog several years back to complement my photography website. Why? Because that is what someone (who is a whole lot smarter than me) told me was the right thing to do. They also told me that if I ever wanted to have a chance at making any money from the web in any way form or fashion that I needed to learn how to use social media and not just sit on a porch smoking cigarettes and posting countless selfies. She also told me to stay on top of social media with it ever changing tide. So I did.

I also started blogging for a second reason and that was to better my typing skills and work on my writing and composition skills. I have to say my typing has become somewhat faster, composition is better as well as grammar. I said “better” not perfect.

I proclaim that I am the world’s worst blogger and I would never recommend anyone ever to follow my blog, but somehow almost 200 people from around the world subscribe and actually read what I write. I never wanted to fill my blog with advertisements because I feel that it makes your content seem forced, like your writing stuff just to get people to click on it so you can get a few pennies for the click. After all this is where fake news comes from… people who write bullshit just so other people will click on it. Over half of the people on my Facebook friends list are bait clickers. There other half on my friends list seem to know what click bait is and stay away. The bait clickers are also the ones who have a ton of malware in their computers and their phones lol. Either way as of now my photography blog will remain ad-free other than posting links on where to buy or review a product that are photography related.

My soon to start up BBQ blog will also remain for the most part ad-free other than product links. This blog will support my catering business website.

My photography YouTube channel is where my Amazon revenue is generated. The power of vlogging is awesome if you know how to do it. I started off with making instructional videos for beginning photographers to learn how to navigate Adobe Lightroom. Three years ago I placed the videos on Vimeo where they were ad-free and made me no money at all. Then I placed those same videos on YouTube and monetized them. I also started making new Lightroom videos. Then I started actually vlogging, but on a very amateur and sporadic level, not to make money, but to have video content to edit… so I could learn how to edit. However while making the video content I thought it would be nice to make something meaningful such as review the gloves I wear when using a camera in the winter time. This would give me a video that I can link to a product on Amazon and also give me content I can use to learn how to edit using Adobe Premiere Pro. This in-turn lead to making little short videos that let me work on camera technique and storytelling. I received a lot of positive feedback from my short video “Autumn Day at the Temple (4:35) https://vimeo.com/144312373 . It was actually very easy to make because I had a 100% vision of what I wanted and I shot the whole thing myself with no help at all. If only everything I did was that easy. But before Autumn Day at the Temple, came the behind the scenes video of a photo shoot I did with Kendall. I shot a few of the opening scenes and the rest was shot by Kendall’s mother Cheryl. I handed her my camera and asked if she would shoot while I worked. She did and I edited it, put it all together and it again became a huge hit with young girls. Nearly every young lady (16 to 25) I meet who has seen that video wants to be the girl in the video (Kendall). Why? Because Kendall looks like she is having so much fun and truly she was. I was having fun too, but truth be told here for the first time… I was actually dying that day. I had a high fever and walking pneumonia, I knew it, I had been sick for a week leading up to that shoot, but wanted to keep going because we had postponed it once or twice already. I just kept telling everybody my voice was messed up because I had allergies. After it was posted not much happened, but as time passed and girls seen the video I started to get more and more calls. Just the other day I had a girl ask me “can I hire you to do a shoot like the girl in the chair in a field?” https://vimeo.com/143212998

I also follow other bloggers and vloggers. Casey Niestat is all the rage for the past few years and I do follow Casey. I feel a lot can be learned from how he works and his style, I feel he is one of the greatest creators of our time. However I would never try to duplicate him as tens of thousands are doing at this very moment. But the big thing I learned from Casey is that you can make money from placing product links in your video description.

Instagram… oh how I love thee. I only have just fewer than 600 followers but they are a rock solid core group. From them are several people who are actual fans of my photography and they really like what I do. They are people from all over the world from all walks of life. Some are school kids, movie stars, news reporters, champion cyclists, journalists, moms, dads, book writers, doctors and a few friends thrown in along the way. At the same time I follow and interact some of the most interesting people… like a surgeon who takes us on his journey to the make-shift operating room in a third world nation while he saves young children’s lives and then photographs the stars at night. Very powerful photography! Or seeing the strongest teenager in the USA set a weightlifting record. Or my friend in Africa who cares for wild animals. Yeah I love my Instagram, very little drama and very little click bait.

So will I get rich & wealthy from the web? Most likely not, but if I can make $26.59 cents in 4 months I know I can make more. Funny thing is anybody can do it. It is a true testament of how easy it is to make money with a video camera and a little creativity.